Could Meditation Be the Answer to Cancer?

How To Not Turn Meditation Time Into Thinking Time 

Science is finally realizing what those who have practiced meditation have known all along: that the positive impact it can have on personal health is a powerful effect.

I’ve felt this effect personally in my life. There is a definite positive difference in my energy, my attitude, and my emotional stability on the days when I make time to meditate.

For more than 5,000 years, meditation has been practiced by those who are spiritual, those who are not spiritual, and everyone in-between. Yet despite these widely accepted practices, the idea that meditation can provide medical benefits is often dismissed without a second thought.

There are 5 key reasons why meditation could be the answer to cancer for some.

#1. Meditation naturally decreases stress. One of the risk factors for cancer development is the presence of chronic stress. Thanks to cortisol, the stress hormone, the body is unable to produce the number of T-cells it needs and this weakens the immune system. There are direct benefits to reducing stress as well, including less anxiety, better sleep, and a reduction in digestive tract symptoms.

#2. Meditation can improve cellular health. When compared to those who do not meditate, the molecular signature of those who regularly meditate is very different. Not only does this improve cellular health, but it also shows benefits for a person’s overall mental health. Research published in 2009 by the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences indicates that meditation may even improve cell growth.

#3. Meditation allows melatonin levels to rise. This hormone helps people go to sleep, but it offers more benefits than just 8 hours of rest. Healthy melatonin levels help to strengthen the immune system, reduce the risks for heart disease, and are considered to be beneficial in the fight against cancer or even diabetes.

#4. Meditation improves your emotional state. This is the most powerful component of meditation in my opinion. Stress is essentially the result of an emotional trauma that occurs in your life. If your boss yells at you, that’s a traumatic event and causes stress. If your car breaks down, that’s a traumatic event as well. Although we can’t control these events, we can use meditation to limit the damage that stress can cause in its aftermath. Harboring hatred, anger, or grief can contribute to worsening health, but with meditation, these negative emotions can be released.

#5. Meditation helps you to make healthy choices. When I can meditate regularly, I find that many of my daily habits tend to reflect a desire to be healthy. I’m more active when I make time to meditate. I make better eating choices. I spend more time in contemplation and less time with mindless entertainment. Not only does this help to keep the weight down, but it also limits chronic stress triggers and the potential for future disease development.

Could meditation be the answer to cancer? That really is up to a medical provider to decide, but the bottom line is this: adding meditation can only help, no matter what you’ve got going on in your life.

Have you added meditation to your daily routine? What are the direct benefits you’ve seen come about from your daily practice?